HTC Radar (С110e) GSM phone review

HTC Radar (С110e) GSM phone review

Mozart was the first Windows Phone from HTC. It was released a year ago, but reached Russia 11 months later, however, already with the Mango OS version. And TiTAN and Radar smartphones, buyers did not have to wait so long: just the other day, their sales began.

Today's review will be devoted to HTC Radar, which came to replace Mozart. At first glance, there are not many changes, but if you dig deeper, it becomes clear what potential users will have to overpay about 5,000 rubles for: for a new chipset and graphics accelerator, for a 5-megapixel camera with "backlight" technology and a front camera, enlarged display diagonal (although not significantly), high brightness of the screen backlight, thin body and other little things.

Since we have already reviewed the Windows Phone mobile operating system and the Mango add-on, in this test we will only talk about the key points of the Radar.

Scope of delivery:

  • Phone
  • USB cable and charger
  • Wired stereo headset
  • User's Guide

Design and controls

Like previous HTC smartphones, Radar's body is "woven" from several pieces. Most of it is made of aluminum – this is the edging around the perimeter and part of the back side. The top and bottom surfaces are made of light gray plastic: the first covers the radio module, and the second covers the battery compartment. Such a design, in my opinion, looks more calm and, so to speak, classically than the “triangles” of Mozart or Sensation. However, as they say, there are no comrades for taste and color.

Despite the fact that the device as a whole is assembled soundly, the bottom cover may loosen over time, as it is not attached securely to the case.

The dimensions of the "Radar" (120.5×61.5 mm) are not very large and allow it to be carried in the pockets of a shirt, trousers or jacket. The weight is also not very big (137 grams) for a phone made of metal https://cars45.com/listing/bmw/x5 and glass (durable, Gorilla Glass).

It feels good in the hand due to its small thickness (10.9 mm) and smooth curves of the body.

On the left side there is a microUSB connector, on the right side there is a metal button for activating the camera. When you hold it, even in the locked state of the phone, the "camera" opens. On the one hand, it is convenient: no need to waste time on unlocking, on the other hand, it can work in your pocket or bag. On the same side is a thin, plastic volume rocker. The location is unfortunate: if you take the phone in your right hand and try to press the “on / off” button (on the upper end) with your index finger to lock the screen, then you accidentally hit the “volume” with your thumb .

A standard 3.5 mm jack is on the top, a microphone is on the bottom. The camera eye (the bezel is almost recessed into the body), the LED flash and the speaker are on the back of the surface. The SIM card is inserted into a metal slide under the bottom plastic cover. There is no slot for a memory card in this model.

Appearance of HTC Radar and Samsung i9023 (on the right):

Appearance of HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (on the right):

Screen

HTC Radar screen diagonal – 3.8″ (physical dimensions – 83×50 mm), HTC Mozart – 3.7" (physical dimensions – 80×49 mm). Resolution – 480×800 pixels, display up to 16 million shades of color, matrices are made using Super-LCD TFT technology, capacitive sensors (up to 10 simultaneous touches). Sensitivity is high.

The viewing angles of both displays are large. But unlike "Mozart", the brightness and contrast of the screen are higher on the "Radar", by about 20-30%. However, the black depth has become smaller; when there should be a dark picture on the screen, in reality it is gray with a pinkish tinge. I got the impression that the developers simply increased the brightness, and in order to keep the battery life the same, they installed a battery with a slightly larger capacity (Radar – 1520, Mozart – 1300 mAh).

The device has a light sensor that is responsible for automatically adjusting the brightness of the screen backlight. He does it correctly and quickly enough. Three levels are available in manual control: low, medium and high. In the sun, the screen practically does not fade, the information is well read.

The device is equipped with an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

HTC Radar display (right) and HTC Mozart in daylight:

Samsung i9000 display (left), Samsung Nexus i9023, HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (right):

Camera

The HTC Radar is equipped with a 5-megapixel autofocus camera and a single-section LED flash. The camera matrix is ​​made using BSI backlight technology (“Back Side Illuminated” or “Back-alluminated sensor”), which allows you to shoot with minimal noise in low light. The bottom line is that in a conventional CMOS sensor, light passes through a metal grid of conductors and circuit elements before it hits the photodiodes. In a BSI sensor, the "wiring" is hidden behind photodiodes. Below is a diagram.

In addition, the lens has an aperture of F=2.2. This means you'll get brighter shots with low subject brightness, as well as a shallow depth of field (as with portrait lenses). From the EXIF ​​information of the photo file, we managed to find out: the minimum ISO value (characterizes the sensitivity of the matrix elements to the light falling on it) is 70, and the maximum is 800.

Another interesting feature of the lens is its wide angle (28mm). For example, when shooting a group of people, it is not necessary to move away so that everyone fits in the frame.

Combined with backlight technology and a large aperture, you can theoretically get original shots. But in practice, it turned out that sharpness and color reproduction are no different from most modern cameras from other manufacturers. However, the noise is really less.

If we compare the camera of "Radar" and "Mozart", then the latter loses only in terms of viewing angle and, perhaps, white balance. At some points, footage shot on HTC Mozart. turned out even better.

Below are comparison shots (on the left – HTC Radar, on the right – HTC Mozart):

HTC Radar (С110e) GSM phone review

Mozart was the first Windows Phone from HTC. It was released a year ago, but reached Russia 11 months later, however, already with the Mango OS version. And TiTAN and Radar smartphones, buyers did not have to wait so long: just the other day, their sales began.

Today's review will be devoted to HTC Radar, which came to replace Mozart. At first glance, there are not many changes, but if you dig deeper, it becomes clear what potential users will have to overpay about 5,000 rubles for: for a new chipset and graphics accelerator, for a 5-megapixel camera with "backlight" technology and a front camera, enlarged display diagonal (although not significantly), high brightness of the screen backlight, thin body and other little things.

Since we have already reviewed the Windows Phone mobile operating system and the Mango add-on, in this test we will only talk about the key points of the Radar.

Scope of delivery:

  • Phone
  • USB cable and charger
  • Wired stereo headset
  • User's Guide

Design and controls

Like previous HTC smartphones, Radar's body is "woven" from several pieces. Most of it is made of aluminum – this is the edging around the perimeter and part of the back side. The top and bottom surfaces are made of light gray plastic: the first covers the radio module, and the second covers the battery compartment. Such a design, in my opinion, looks more calm and, so to speak, classically than the “triangles” of Mozart or Sensation. However, as they say, there are no comrades for taste and color.

Despite the fact that the device as a whole is assembled soundly, the bottom cover may loosen over time, as it is not attached securely to the case.

Proximity and light sensors are located on the front panel. Responded quickly and clearly, no problems. Nearby is a front VGA camera designed for video calls (and admiring yourself 🙂 ). A speaker is hidden under a decorative metal mesh. Its volume is high, speech transmission is clear, but I did not like the reproduced frequency range: mostly high frequencies are heard.

Below is the screen, and below it there are traditionally three touch buttons: "search", "start" and "back". With a long press of the latter, previously launched applications are opened. In the phone settings, you can configure the "background tasks" option, i.e. install those applications that can run in the background even if they are closed.

On the left side there is a microUSB connector, on the right side there is a metal button for activating the camera. When you hold it, even in the locked state of the phone, the "camera" opens. On the one hand, it's convenient: you don't have to waste time unlocking it, on the other hand, it can work in your pocket or bag. On the same side is a thin, plastic volume rocker. The location is unfortunate: if you take the phone in your right hand and try to press the “on / off” button (on the upper end) with your index finger to lock the screen, then you accidentally hit the “volume” with your thumb .

A standard 3.5 mm jack is on the top, a microphone is on the bottom. The camera eye (the bezel is almost recessed into the body), the LED flash and the speaker are on the back of the surface. The SIM card is inserted into a metal slide under the bottom plastic cover. There is no slot for a memory card in this model.

Appearance of HTC Radar and Samsung i9023 (on the right):

Appearance of HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (on the right):

Screen

HTC Radar screen diagonal – 3.8″ (physical dimensions – 83×50 mm), HTC Mozart – 3.7" (physical dimensions – 80×49 mm). Resolution – 480×800 pixels, display up to 16 million shades of color, matrices are made using Super-LCD TFT technology, capacitive sensors (up to 10 simultaneous touches). Sensitivity is high.

The viewing angles of both displays are large. But unlike "Mozart", the brightness and contrast of the screen are higher on the "Radar", by about 20-30%. However, the black depth has become smaller; when there should be a dark picture on the screen, in reality it is gray with a pinkish tinge. I got the impression that the developers simply increased the brightness, and in order to keep the battery life the same, they installed a battery with a slightly larger capacity (Radar – 1520, Mozart – 1300 mAh).

The device has a light sensor that is responsible for automatically adjusting the brightness of the screen backlight. He does it correctly and quickly enough. Three levels are available in manual control: low, medium and high. In the sun, the screen practically does not fade, the information is well read.

The device is equipped with an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

HTC Radar display (right) and HTC Mozart in daylight:

Samsung i9000 display (left), Samsung Nexus i9023, HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (right):

Camera

The HTC Radar is equipped with a 5-megapixel autofocus camera and a single-section LED flash. The camera matrix is ​​made using BSI backlight technology (“Back Side Illuminated” or “Back-alluminated sensor”), which allows you to shoot with minimal noise in low light. The bottom line is that in a conventional CMOS sensor, light passes through a metal grid of conductors and circuit elements before it hits the photodiodes. In a BSI sensor, the "wiring" is hidden behind photodiodes. Below is a diagram.

Below are comparison shots (on the left – HTC Radar, on the right – HTC Mozart):

HTC Radar (С110e) GSM phone review

Mozart was the first Windows Phone from HTC. It was released a year ago, but reached Russia 11 months later, however, already with the Mango OS version. And TiTAN and Radar smartphones, buyers did not have to wait so long: just the other day, their sales began.

Today's review will be devoted to HTC Radar, which came to replace Mozart. At first glance, there are not many changes, but if you dig deeper, it becomes clear what potential users will have to overpay about 5,000 rubles for: for a new chipset and graphics accelerator, for a 5-megapixel camera with "backlight" technology and a front camera, enlarged display diagonal (although not significantly), high brightness of the screen backlight, thin body and other little things.

Since we have already reviewed the Windows Phone mobile operating system and the Mango add-on, in this test we will only talk about the key points of the Radar.

Scope of delivery:

  • Phone
  • USB cable and charger
  • Wired stereo headset
  • User's Guide

Design and controls

Like previous HTC smartphones, Radar's body is "woven" from several pieces. Most of it is made of aluminum – this is the edging around the perimeter and part of the back side. The top and bottom surfaces are made of light gray plastic: the first covers the radio module, and the second covers the battery compartment. Such a design, in my opinion, looks more calm and, so to speak, classically than the “triangles” of Mozart or Sensation. However, as they say, there are no comrades for taste and color.

Despite the fact that the device as a whole is assembled soundly, the bottom cover may loosen over time, as it is not attached securely to the case.

Proximity and light sensors are located on the front panel. Responded quickly and clearly, no problems. Nearby is a front VGA camera designed for video calls (and admiring yourself 🙂 ). A speaker is hidden under a decorative metal mesh. Its volume is high, speech transmission is clear, but I did not like the reproduced frequency range: mostly high frequencies are heard.

Below is the screen, and below it are traditionally three touch buttons: "search", "start" and "back". With a long press of the latter, previously launched applications are opened. In the phone settings, you can configure the "background tasks" option, i.e. install those applications that can run in the background even if they are closed.

On the left side there is a microUSB connector, on the right side there is a metal button for activating the camera. When you hold it, even in the locked state of the phone, the "camera" opens. On the one hand, it's convenient: you don't have to waste time unlocking it, on the other hand, it can work in your pocket or bag. On the same side is a thin, plastic volume rocker. The location is unfortunate: if you take the phone in your right hand and try to press the “on / off” button (on the upper end) with your index finger to lock the screen, then you accidentally hit the “volume” with your thumb .

A standard 3.5 mm jack is on the top, a microphone is on the bottom. The camera eye (the bezel is almost recessed into the body), the LED flash and the speaker are on the back of the surface. The SIM card is inserted into a metal slide under the bottom plastic cover. There is no slot for a memory card in this model.

Appearance of HTC Radar and Samsung i9023 (on the right):

Appearance of HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (on the right):

Screen

HTC Radar screen diagonal – 3.8″ (physical dimensions – 83×50 mm), HTC Mozart – 3.7" (physical dimensions – 80×49 mm). Resolution – 480×800 pixels, display up to 16 million shades of color, matrices are made using Super-LCD TFT technology, capacitive sensors (up to 10 simultaneous touches). Sensitivity is high.

The viewing angles of both displays are large. But unlike "Mozart", the brightness and contrast of the screen are higher on the "Radar", by about 20-30%. However, the black depth has become smaller; when there should be a dark picture on the screen, in reality it is gray with a pinkish tinge. I got the impression that the developers simply increased the brightness, and in order to keep the battery life the same, they installed a battery with a slightly larger capacity (Radar – 1520, Mozart – 1300 mAh).

The device has a light sensor that is responsible for automatically adjusting the brightness of the screen backlight. He does it correctly and quickly enough. Three levels are available in manual control: low, medium and high. In the sun, the screen practically does not fade, the information is well read.

The device is equipped with an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

HTC Radar display (right) and HTC Mozart in daylight:

Samsung i9000 display (left), Samsung Nexus i9023, HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (right):

Camera

The HTC Radar is equipped with a 5-megapixel autofocus camera and a single-section LED flash. The camera matrix is ​​made using BSI backlight technology (“Back Side Illuminated” or “Back-alluminated sensor”), which allows you to shoot with minimal noise in low light. The bottom line is that in a conventional CMOS sensor, light passes through a metal grid of conductors and circuit elements before it hits the photodiodes. In a BSI sensor, the "wiring" is hidden behind photodiodes. Below is a diagram.

In addition, the lens has an aperture of F=2.2. This means you'll get brighter shots with low subject brightness, as well as a shallow depth of field (as with portrait lenses). From the EXIF ​​information of the photo file, we managed to find out: the minimum ISO value (characterizes the sensitivity of the matrix elements to the light falling on it) is 70, and the maximum is 800.

Another interesting feature of the lens is its wide angle (28mm). For example, when shooting a group of people, it is not necessary to move away so that everyone fits in the frame.

Combined with backlight technology and a large aperture, you can theoretically get original shots. But in practice, it turned out that sharpness and color reproduction are no different from most modern cameras from other manufacturers. However, the noise is really less.

If we compare the camera of "Radar" and "Mozart", then the latter loses only in terms of viewing angle and, perhaps, white balance. At some points, footage shot on HTC Mozart. turned out even better.

Below are comparison shots (on the left – HTC Radar, on the right – HTC Mozart):

HTC Radar (С110e) GSM phone review

Mozart was the first Windows Phone from HTC. It was released a year ago, but reached Russia 11 months later, however, already with the Mango OS version. And TiTAN and Radar smartphones, buyers did not have to wait so long: just the other day, their sales began.

Today's review will be devoted to HTC Radar, which came to replace Mozart. At first glance, there are not many changes, but if you dig deeper, it becomes clear what potential users will have to overpay about 5,000 rubles for: for a new chipset and graphics accelerator, for a 5-megapixel camera with "backlight" technology and a front camera, enlarged display diagonal (although not significantly), high brightness of the screen backlight, thin body and other little things.

Since we have already reviewed the Windows Phone mobile operating system and the Mango add-on, in this test we will only talk about the key points of the Radar.

Scope of delivery:

  • Phone
  • USB cable and charger
  • Wired stereo headset
  • User's Guide

Design and controls

Like previous HTC smartphones, Radar's body is "woven" from several pieces. Most of it is made of aluminum – this is the edging around the perimeter and part of the back side. The top and bottom surfaces are made of light gray plastic: the first covers the radio module, and the second covers the battery compartment. Such a design, in my opinion, looks more calm and, so to speak, classically than the “triangles” of Mozart or Sensation. However, as they say, there are no comrades for taste and color.

Despite the fact that the device as a whole is assembled soundly, the bottom cover may loosen over time, as it is not attached securely to the case.

The dimensions of the "Radar" (120.5×61.5 mm) are not very large and allow it to be carried in the pockets of a shirt, trousers or jacket. The weight is also not very big (137 grams) for a phone made of metal https://cars45.com/listing/bmw/x5 and glass (durable, Gorilla Glass).

It feels good in the hand due to its small thickness (10.9 mm) and smooth curves of the body.

Proximity and light sensors are located on the front panel. Responded quickly and clearly, no problems. Nearby is a front VGA camera designed for video calls (and admiring yourself 🙂 ). A speaker is hidden under a decorative metal mesh. Its volume is high, speech transmission is clear, but I did not like the reproduced frequency range: mostly high frequencies are heard.

Below is the screen, and below it are traditionally three touch buttons: "search", "start" and "back". With a long press of the latter, previously launched applications are opened. In the phone settings, you can configure the "background tasks" option, i.e. install those applications that can run in the background even if they are closed.

On the left side there is a microUSB connector, on the right side there is a metal button for activating the camera. When you hold it, even in the locked state of the phone, the "camera" opens. On the one hand, it's convenient: you don't have to waste time unlocking it, on the other hand, it can work in your pocket or bag. On the same side is a thin, plastic volume rocker. The location is unfortunate: if you take the phone in your right hand and try to press the “on / off” button (on the upper end) with your index finger to lock the screen, then you accidentally hit the “volume” with your thumb .

A standard 3.5 mm jack is on the top, a microphone is on the bottom. The camera eye (the bezel is almost recessed into the body), the LED flash and the speaker are on the back of the surface. The SIM card is inserted into a metal slide under the bottom plastic cover. There is no slot for a memory card in this model.

Appearance of HTC Radar and Samsung i9023 (on the right):

Appearance of HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (on the right):

Screen

HTC Radar screen diagonal – 3.8″ (physical dimensions – 83×50 mm), HTC Mozart – 3.7" (physical dimensions – 80×49 mm). Resolution – 480×800 pixels, display up to 16 million shades of color, matrices are made using Super-LCD TFT technology, capacitive sensors (up to 10 simultaneous touches). Sensitivity is high.

The viewing angles of both displays are large. But unlike "Mozart", the brightness and contrast of the screen are higher on the "Radar", by about 20-30%. However, the black depth has become smaller; when there should be a dark picture on the screen, in reality it is gray with a pinkish tinge. I got the impression that the developers simply increased the brightness, and in order to keep the battery life the same, they installed a battery with a slightly larger capacity (Radar – 1520, Mozart – 1300 mAh).

The device has a light sensor that is responsible for automatically adjusting the brightness of the screen backlight. He does it correctly and quickly enough. Three levels are available in manual control: low, medium and high. In the sun, the screen practically does not fade, the information is well read.

The device is equipped with an accelerometer and a gyroscope.

HTC Radar display (right) and HTC Mozart in daylight:

Samsung i9000 display (left), Samsung Nexus i9023, HTC Radar and HTC Mozart (right):

Camera

The HTC Radar is equipped with a 5-megapixel autofocus camera and a single-section LED flash. The camera matrix is ​​made using BSI backlight technology (“Back Side Illuminated” or “Back-alluminated sensor”), which allows you to shoot with minimal noise in low light. The bottom line is that in a conventional CMOS sensor, light passes through a metal grid of conductors and circuit elements before it hits the photodiodes. In a BSI sensor, the "wiring" is hidden behind photodiodes. Below is a diagram.

In addition, the lens has an aperture of F=2.2. This means you'll get brighter shots with low subject brightness, as well as a shallow depth of field (as with portrait lenses). From the EXIF ​​information of the photo file, we managed to find out: the minimum ISO value (characterizes the sensitivity of the matrix elements to the light falling on it) is 70, and the maximum is 800.

Another interesting feature of the lens is its wide angle (28mm). For example, when shooting a group of people, it is not necessary to move away so that everyone fits in the frame.

Combined with backlight technology and a large aperture, you can theoretically get https://tonaton.ug/c_shoes/t_gucci original shots. But in practice, it turned out that sharpness and color reproduction are no different from most modern cameras from other manufacturers. However, the noise is really less.

If we compare the camera of "Radar" and "Mozart", then the latter loses only in terms of viewing angle and, perhaps, white balance. At some points, footage shot on HTC Mozart. turned out even better.

Below are comparison shots (on the left – HTC Radar, on the right – HTC Mozart):

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